Angel in Exile (1948)

vt Dark Violence
US / 86 minutes / bw / Republic Dir: Allan Dwan, Philip Ford Scr: Charles Larson Cine: Reggie Lanning Cast: John Carroll, Adele Mara, Thomas Gomez, Barton MacLane, Alfonso Bedoya, Grant Withers, Howland Chamberlin, Art Smith, Paul Fix, Tom Powers, Ian Wolfe, Elsa Lorraine Zepeda, Mary Currier.

Adele Mara as Raquel Chavez.

The movie sets out its stall early, declaring right there in the opening credits that

This is the story of a miracle. To those who do not believe in miracles, we can offer no explanation. We can only point out that the man to whom this one occurred . . . . didn’t believe in miracles either . . .

Like me, he probably didn’t know either why the first ellipsis was there. Whatever the truth about that, the stress on the “miracle” aspect of the plot—here and in most of the rare reviews—is probably why I overlooked Angel in Exile when drawing up the entry list for my Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir: the movie isn’t a film noir, but it has sufficient noirish interest to have qualified it for inclusion in that book.

Spring 1939 in California, and Charlie Dakin (Carroll) is released after five years in stir for his part in a heist that netted a million dollars’ worth of gold dust. He’s met at the gate by Ernie Coons (Smith), his partner in the heist, who’s been keeping the loot safe all through Charlie’s enforced absence. Ernie reckons the two of them can now split the proceeds; trouble is, the other two participants in the heist, Max Giorgio (MacLane) and Carl Spitz (Fix), have a different idea.

John Carroll as Charlie (left) and Art Smith as Ernie.

Ernie’s cunning plan for laundering the gold is to buy for a song an abandoned mine in the Arizona mountains, stow the dust there, then pretend to dig it up. It’s a good plan, too, until Max and Carl turn up. Another problem is that a local land-management officer, J.H. Higgins (Chamberlin), swiftly guesses what’s going on and demands to be cut in as well.

A further complication is the involvement of the inhabitants of a local village Continue reading

They All Come Out (1939)

US / 69 minutes / bw / Loew’s, MGM Dir: Jacques Tourneur Pr: Jack Chertok Scr: John C. Higgins Cine: Clyde DeVinna, Paul C. Vogel Cast: Rita Johnson, Tom Neal, Bernard Nedell, Edward Gargan, John Gallaudet, Addison Richards, Frank M. Thomas, George Tobias, Ann Shoemaker, Charles Lane, Fay Helm, Paul Fix.

As the opening credits say, They All Come Out is

Dedicated to
THE UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE,
whose coöperation made this picture possible.

That’s not necessarily a good thing.

Thanks to an encounter with lovely Kitty Carson (Johnson), hobo Joe Cameron (Neal) gets himself a job at last . . . as getaway driver for a gang of bank robbers: Continue reading

World Accuses, The (1934)

US / 61 minutes / bw / Chesterfield, Batcheller Dir: Charles Lamont Scr: Charles Belden Cine: M.A. Andersen Cast: Vivian Tobin, Dickie Moore, Cora Sue Collins, Russell Hopton, Harold Huber, Paul Fix, Sarah Edwards, Jamison Thomas, Mary Carr, Robert Elliott, Bryant Washburn, Barbara Bedford, Robert Frazier, Lloyd Ingraham, Broderick O’Farrell, Jane Keckley.

World Accuses - 0 opener

It’s 1928 or 1929. Formerly a celebrated Broadway actress, Lola Weymouth (Tobin) now lives with her milquetoast socialite husband John (Fix) and her baby son Tommy (uncredited at this age). The marriage is troubled by the fact that John is work-shy and the couple are living off whatever of his inheritance his termagant mother Lucille (Edwards) chooses to let them have. John lacks the guts to support his wife against his mother; it’s partly that he hasn’t let go of her apron strings, partly that she hasn’t let go of the purse strings.

World Accuses - 1 Weak-willed John can't face up to his mother

Weak-willed John (Paul Fix) can’t face up to his mother (Sarah Edwards).

One night after a row between Lola and Lucille, the young couple leave Tommy in the care of his nurse (uncredited) and go out on the town, meeting up with various of Lola’s quondam Broadway chums. One of these, unfortunately, is a very drunk old flame of Lola’s, Checkers Fraley (Huber). He picks a fight with John, knocks him down, and inadvertently kills him.

Checkers goes off for a long spell in the pen, while a viciously spiteful Continue reading

Alias Boston Blackie (1942)

US / 67 minutes / bw / Columbia Dir: Lew Landers Pr: Wallace MacDonald Scr: Paul Yawitz Cine: Philip Tannura Cast: Chester Morris, Adele Mara, Richard Lane, George E. Stone, Lloyd Corrigan, Walter Sande, Larry Parks, George McKay, Cy Kendall, Paul Fix, Ben Taggart.

Blackie (Chester Morris) and The Runt (George E. Stone) address the Christmas tree.

It’s Christmas Eve and Boston Blackie (Morris)—a sort of Robin Hood figure, a reformed criminal who now helps the downtrodden and solves crimes—has mounted a vaudeville show for the inmates of the state prison. Eve Sanders (Mara), a friend of the famous clown Roggi McKay (McKay), begs to be included in the company so she can have an additional chance to see her brother, Joe Trilby (Parks), who’s doing time for a crime he didn’t commit. During the performance, Joe overpowers Roggi, steals his clown costume, performs his act, and then travels back to the city on the performers’ bus—among his fellow-passengers being Blackie’s old nemesis, Inspector Farraday (Lane).

Joe Trilby (Larry Parks) becomes the fake Roggi.

Joe plans to knock off the two crooks who framed him, Duke Banton—”that tin-horn bookie from Saratoga,” as someone calls him—and Steve Caveroni (Fix), currently working as a cabby. Informed by Continue reading