Murder in the Blue Room (1944)

US / 60 minutes / bw / Universal Dir: Leslie Goodwins Assoc Pr: Frank Gross Scr: I.A.L. Diamond, Stanley Davis Story: Geheimnis des Blauen Zimmers (1932 screenplay) by Erich Philippi Cine: George Robinson Cast: Anne Gwynne, Donald Cook, John Litel, Grace McDonald, Betty Kean, June Preisser, Regis Toomey, Nella Walker, Andrew Tombes, Ian Wolfe, Emmett Vogan, Bill MacWilliams (i.e., Bill Williams), Frank Marlowe.

The third Hollywood remake of a German movie, Geheimnis des Blauen Zimmers (1932), its two predecessors being Secret of the Blue Room (1933) and The Missing Guest (1938); I haven’t seen the latter.

This time the story—including its mystery elements—has been reworked quite extensively to make the movie something akin to a musical comedy.

The Three Jazzybelles: left to right, June Preisser as Jerry, Betty Kean as Betty, and Grace McDonald as Peggy.

The remake was initially meant as a Ritz Brothers vehicle, but fortunately that fell through. In their place we have The Three Jazzybelles (geddit?), a seemingly nonce team-up of Grace McDonald, Betty Kean and June Preisser. This trio offer enough fun and talent that I had a quick look around to see if there were perhaps more Three Jazzybelles movies. Continue reading

Secret of the Blue Room (1933)

US / 66 minutes / bw / Universal Dir: Kurt Neumann Pr: Carl Laemmle Jr. Scr: William Hurlbut Story: Geheimnis des Blauen Zimmers (1932 screenplay) by Erich Philippi Cine: Charles Stumar Cast: Lionel Atwill, Gloria Stuart, Paul Lukas, Edward Arnold, Onslow Stevens, William Janney, Robert Barrat, Muriel Kirkland, Russell Hopton, Elizabeth Patterson, Anders Van Haden, James Durkin.

The first of three Hollywood remakes of a German movie, Geheimnis des Blauen Zimmers (1932), its two successors being The Missing Guest (1938) and Murder in the Blue Room (1944), ‎ this is introduced by the haunting sounds of Tchaikovsky’s main theme from Swan Lake.

Gloria Stuart as Irene.

In a stately pile somewhere, Irene von Helldorf (Stuart) is sitting up late to celebrate the first few hours of her 21st birthday with father Robert (Atwill) and the three men who seek her hand. Conversation turns to the mansion’s quondam guest room, the Blue Room, no longer used since, twenty years ago, three people died in it in (a) quick succession and (b) inexplicable circumstances, the door being locked from the inside.

Lionel Atwill as paterfamilias Robert.

To impress Irene with his manly courage and belie his extraordinary drippiness Continue reading